In silico identification of the full complement of subtilase-encoding genes and characterization of the role of TaSBT1.7 in resistance against stripe rust in wheat.

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TitleIn silico identification of the full complement of subtilase-encoding genes and characterization of the role of TaSBT1.7 in resistance against stripe rust in wheat.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsYang, Y, Zhang, F, Zhou, T, Fang, A, Yu, Y, Bi, C, Xiao, S
JournalPhytopathology
Date Published2020 Jul 28
ISSN0031-949X
Abstract

Plant subtilases or subtilisin-like proteases comprise a very diverse family of serine peptidases that participates in a broad spectrum of biological functions. Despite increasing evidence for roles of subtilases in plant immunity in recent years, little is known about wheat (Triticum aestivum) subtilases (TaSBTs). Here, we identified 255 TaSBT genes from bread wheat using the latest version 2.0 of the reference genome sequence. The SBT family can be grouped into five clades, from TaSBT1, to TaSBT5, based on a phylogenetic tree constructed with deduced protein sequences. In silico protein-domain analysis revealed the existence of considerable sequence diversification of the TaSBT family, which, together with the local clustered gene distribution, suggests that TaSBT genes have undergone extensive functional diversification. Among those TaSBTs genes whose expression was altered by biotic factors, TaSBT1.7 was found to be induced in wheat leaves by chitin and flg22 elicitors, as well as six examined pathogens, implying a role for TaSBT1.7 in plant defense. Transient overexpression of TaSBT1.7 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in necrotic cell death. Moreover, knocking down TaSBT1.7 in wheat using barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing compromised the hypersensitive response and resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust. Taken together, this study defined the full complement of wheat subtilase genes and provided evidence for a positive role of one particular member, TaSBT1.7, in the incompatible interaction between wheat and a stripe rust pathogen.

DOI10.1094/PHYTO-05-20-0176-R
Alternate JournalPhytopathology
PubMed ID32720876