Physiologically relevant free Ca ion concentrations regulate STRA6-calmodulin complex formation via the BP2 region of STRA6.

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TitlePhysiologically relevant free Ca ion concentrations regulate STRA6-calmodulin complex formation via the BP2 region of STRA6.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsYoung, BD, Varney, KM, Wilder, PT, Costabile, BK, Pozharski, E, Cook, ME, Godoy-Ruiz, R, Clarke, OB, Mancia, F, Weber, DJ
JournalJ Mol Biol
Pagination167272
Date Published2021 Sep 27
ISSN1089-8638
Abstract

The interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the receptor for retinol uptake, STRA6, involves an α-helix termed BP2 that is located on the intracellular side of this homodimeric transporter [1]. In the absence of Ca, NMR data showed that a peptide derived from BP2 bound to the C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) of Mg-bound CaM (CaM). Upon titration of Ca into CaM-BP2, NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs) were observed for residues in the C-lobe, including those in the EF-hand Ca-binding domains, EF3 and EF4 (K = 60 ± 7 nM). As higher concentrations of free Ca were achieved, CSPs occurred for residues in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) including those in EF1 and EF2 (K = 1,000 ± 160 nM). Thermodynamic and kinetic Ca binding studies showed that BP2 addition increased the Ca-binding affinity of CaM and slowed its Ca dissociation rates (k) in both the C- and N-lobe EF-hand domains, respectively. These data are consistent with BP2 binding to the C-lobe of CaM at low free Ca concentrations (<100 nM) like those found at resting intracellular levels. As free Ca levels approach 1,000 nM, which is typical inside a cell upon an intracellular Ca-signaling event, BP2 is shown here to interact with both the N- and C-lobes of Ca-loaded CaM (CaM-BP2). Because this structural rearrangement observed for the CaM-BP2 complex occurs as intracellular free Ca concentrations approach those typical of a Ca-signaling event (K = 1,000 ± 160 nM), this conformational change could be relevant to vitamin A transport by full-length CaM-STRA6.

DOI10.1016/j.jmb.2021.167272
Alternate JournalJ Mol Biol
PubMed ID34592217