Molecular analysis of the laccase gene from the chestnut blight fungus and selective suppression of its expression in an isogenic hypovirulent strain.

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TitleMolecular analysis of the laccase gene from the chestnut blight fungus and selective suppression of its expression in an isogenic hypovirulent strain.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1992
AuthorsChoi, GH, Larson, TG, Nuss, DL
JournalMol Plant Microbe Interact
Volume5
Issue2
Pagination119-28
Date Published1992 Mar-Apr
ISSN0894-0282
KeywordsAmino Acid Sequence, Ascomycota, Base Sequence, Blotting, Northern, Blotting, Southern, DNA, Fungal, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal, Humans, Introns, Laccase, Molecular Sequence Data, Neurospora crassa, Oxidoreductases, Plants, RNA, Double-Stranded, RNA, Viral, Sequence Alignment, Virulence, Virus Physiological Phenomena
Abstract

The gene encoding laccase in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, has been cloned and characterized. The predicted C. parasitica laccase amino acid sequence (591 aa) was 57% identical to the Neurospora crassa laccase sequence and contained four potential copper-binding regions that are conserved in a number of copper-binding proteins. Treatment of a virulent C. parasitica strain with 3 microM cycloheximide resulted in a marked increase in laccase mRNA accumulation, whereas identical treatment of an isogenic strain that contained a hypovirulence-associated virus failed to significantly increase laccase mRNA levels. In contrast, the accumulation of mRNAs encoding beta-tubulin, actin, or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was not appreciably altered by either the presence of a hypovirulence-associated virus or treatment with cycloheximide. These results provide evidence that the expression of a specific fungal gene encoding a known protein product is selectively modulated by a hypovirulence-associated virus.

Alternate JournalMol. Plant Microbe Interact.
PubMed ID1535523