Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Is Impaired in Type A-B Niemann-Pick Disease Model Cells and Can Be Restored by ICAM-1-Mediated Enzyme Replacement.

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TitleClathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Is Impaired in Type A-B Niemann-Pick Disease Model Cells and Can Be Restored by ICAM-1-Mediated Enzyme Replacement.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsRappaport, J, Garnacho, C, Muro, S
JournalMol Pharm
Date Published2014 Jun 26
ISSN1543-8392
Abstract<p>Drugs often use endocytosis to achieve intracellular delivery, either by passive uptake from the extracellular fluid or by active targeting of cell surface features such as endocytic receptors. An example is enzyme replacement therapy, a clinically practiced treatment for several lysosomal storage diseases where glycosylated recombinant enzymes naturally target the mannose-6-phosphate receptor and are internalized by clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). However, lysosomal substrate accumulation, a hallmark of these diseases, has been indirectly linked to aberrant endocytic activity. These effects are poorly understood, creating an obstacle to therapeutic efficiency. Here we explored endocytic activity in fibroblasts from patients with type A Niemann-Pick disease, a lysosomal storage disease characterized by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. The uptake of fluid phase markers and clathrin-associated ligands, formation of endocytic structures, and recruitment of intracellular clathrin to ligand binding sites were all altered, demonstrating aberrant CME in these cells. Model polymer nanocarriers targeted to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which are internalized by a clathrin-independent route, enhanced the intracellular delivery of recombinant ASM more than 10-fold compared to free enzyme. This strategy reduced substrate accumulation and restored clathrin endocytic activity to wild-type levels. There appears to be a relationship between lysosomal storage and diminished CME, and bypassing this pathway by targeting ICAM-1 may enhance future therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.</p>
DOI10.1021/mp500241y
Alternate JournalMol. Pharm.
PubMed ID24949999